I’m getting political: The Big Healthcare Speech


Last night, like many of my fellow Americans, I was glued to the tv watching President Obama speak on his health care reform. While I am in no way shape or form anywhere close to understanding politics – that was a pretty freakin’ good speech.

I liked that he outlined his plan well. He made short direct statements on his points and kept everything easy to understand. It’s no secret I like and voted for Obama. Last night I felt he showed me exactly why I voted for him; to fight to bring about the change that the people want and need for the mounting crisis that is health care in this country.

A few republicans, one in particular, showed very poor character last night. I’m not sure when the last time was that I wanted to make a politician go stand in the corner for being so disrespectful. Fine, you don’t agree with Obama but to be making a spectacle when the President, a man who whether you like him or not certainly has earned the right to have some respect when he is speaking…Rep. Joe Wilson’s shouting out only made himself look like an ass if you want my opinion about it.

President Obama can deliver a speech, that much is for sure. But how do you feel about it?

Did you watch the speech? What are your thoughts? Do you think Obama helped or hurt his cause?

You can see the full text of the speech here: Health Care Speech

17 thoughts on “I’m getting political: The Big Healthcare Speech

  1. Well he is a good speaker… thats about it for me. Really – this healthcare of his won't cost the tax payers anything?? Nothing added to the deficit? And it won't help ALL the illegals…. um, I also have some swamp land to sell anyone who believes that. Just what we need a healthcare system like Europe or Canada! Seriously, you just left and complained about the healthcare over there. I don't want the same for us here.Healthcare needs fixed…. but it DOES NOT NEED TO BE GOVERNMENT RUNNED!! Not sure how to fix it, but certainly not the current plan. This guy has already spent more money than all the other presidents combined!!!And he didn't once mention what about all the pharmacy kick backs, etc the government already gives them. Or malpractice – how will that be handled… Paid out from my taxes?? Tons to think about. We need to fix it – but not rush with his plan.Just my thoughts. ;o) lolCan't wait to read other comments.

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  2. Sorry didn't watch. I agree the health care sucks here, but I have no idea on how to go about changing it. Hopefully he will be able to find a good plan that can pacify “most” people (cause you know there is always one who will hate it-and NO Missty, I'm not talking about you. 🙂 And to the other guy who was so rude- he is such a butthead (said in Mackenzie's best valley girl voice)

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  3. Missty – I tend to believe him when the says the money isn't going to be a cost to taxpayers. He spelled out where the money would come from (would have to go back and look to quote the spot). IN relation to Canada's system he said “But either one would represent a radical shift that would disrupt the health care most people currently have.” So he is NOT saying we should be like Canada's health care system.He goes on to say: “nothing in our plan requires you to change what you have.” if you have health care through your job.My understanding of the bill is that he actually wants to make Insurance companies liable for the wrong they've done for years – overcharging for services, denying insurance for those with preexisting conditions.Page three of the link I quoted in my post relates to the question of it being a 'government takeover': My health care proposal has also been attacked by some who oppose reform as a “government takeover” of the entire health care system. As proof, critics point to a provision in our plan that allows the uninsured and small businesses to choose a publicly-sponsored insurance option, administered by the government just like Medicaid or Medicare.So let me set the record straight. My guiding principle is, and always has been, that consumers do better when there is choice and competition. Unfortunately, in 34 states, 75% of the insurance market is controlled by five or fewer companies. In Alabama, almost 90% is controlled by just one company. Without competition, the price of insurance goes up and the quality goes down. And it makes it easier for insurance companies to treat their customers badly – by cherry-picking the healthiest individuals and trying to drop the sickest; by overcharging small businesses who have no leverage; and by jacking up rates.” “But an additional step we can take to keep insurance companies honest is by making a not-for-profit public option available in the insurance exchange. Let me be clear – it would only be an option for those who don’t have insurance. No one would be forced to choose it, and it would not impact those of you who already have insurance.”Anyway. I think it speaks for itself. The German system is not the same as what he is proposing (to my understanding).

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  4. He is definitely a great orator.I agree that Americans need medical coverage. Currently, there are 47 million Americans who are not covered. I would like to see a program that would serve them.This is only 15% of the population though which means that 85% of Americans are covered.So I agree that we need to find some coverage for those who don't have any. And I agree that insurance companies and medical institutions need to make some changes so that the consumers are not getting gouged.I definitely do not want a government run health system, but it sounds like Obama is backing off of that idea.

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  5. Andrea, great job in outlining President Obama's key points. I watched last night very intently and was comforted by the fact that those WITH insurance will not be affected negatively, only assured more stability and care. My family has always carried health insurance, however, we have been denied coverage for our children for several treatments that doctor's told us were a necessity but the insurance companies denied based on ludicrous reasons. One of my favorites goes like this: My twin's were preemies and before we left the NICU we were told by our Neonatologist that it was an absolute necessity that both of them receive the RSV vaccination each month through the RSV season. Each vaccination was $1,000 and because Lincoln was larger he needed a 1/2 LARGER DOSE = $1500. We could not pay $2500 a month for 4 months. We simply could not afford it. Our insurance company DENIED us because neither my husband or myself SMOKE. I also do not send my children to DAY CARE. However, if I were to take up smoking, my insurance company would have covered the vaccinations in full. When I presented these issues to my insurance company they couldn't give me a valid reason as to why coverage was being denied other than the fact that I do not smoke and my children were not in day care. RIDICULOUS. Because of these reasons my children were at risk for a very serious illness. THIS SHOULD NOT HAPPEN IN AMERICA. People WITH coverage should be protected, and people WITHOUT coverage should have more options available to them. Change is scary, I get that, but our healthcare system NEEDS a change.Now you got me all worked up! Rock on with your bad self girlfriend, I'm off to find some chocolate.

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  6. That guy was a jackass.. how dare he scream out like an angry toddler while the president is speaking.I love Obama. I think he's smart and not afraid to shake things up in order to fix them. The current system isn't working and he knows he has to be the bad guy in order to make it work.

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  7. I did not see the televised speech, and I read parts of the link you shared but cannot say I read it word for word.As someone in a country that has what I believe to be a working health care system (Canada) – despite what others here and publicly have argued throughout this debate – I don't see how his plan cannot cause tax increases in the long run.In Canada, everyone is on the same level playing field for medical care. There are opportunities for improvement through job-funded or personally-funded supplemental insurance (example: everyone gets ward room coverage, but hospitals have semi-private and private rooms available for those with additional coverage or willing to pay the surcharge out of pocket). Some items are outside this system, notably vision and dental care, and are solely covered by supplemental insurance.What Obama outlined is a system where some people will have government-funded coverage while others would remain with their employer-funded or personally-funded insurance. He mentioned exemptions for small businesses among other caveats. In the grand scheme of things, however, it read (at least to me) like a welfare-style system, where the government “provides” for those who cannot obtain for themselves.It's a better system than is in place now, but that's only because more people will receive care because of it. I don't think it's a viable long-term solution, as it has too many potential loopholes that will be exploited and then patched with yet more reform.

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  8. Being in Canada I know I've never not gone to the hospital if needed. I've never had to HAVE insurance to go to the hospital. Just saying…I need insurance to cover the cost of my prescriptions. That's expensive!! I was fortunate to have insurance while living in the USA, but if I didnt' have it? I'm pretty sure I would have died of Gallbladder disease. I had insurance I went to the dr, I was sent to the hospital, I got it dealt with while my hubbie filled in the paper work. my husband thought he was having a heart attack 3yrs ago here in Canada, he went to the hospital parked his van, and went in and they looked after him. We never got any bills or any “this is not a bills”. If you've lived here? I think you can understand it and comment but if you are on the outside looking in? think again

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  9. What we need to do is change STATE laws. Like Alabamas! Let the free market of competition get in there and offer insurance. Insurance companies would then have to lower the policies to compete with one another. And no I don't believe for one minute that the tax payers aren't going to be paying for it. He can say it all he wants. Seriously so far we have had to pay for everything. Even his car program rebates… where do you think that money is coming from? Us.He also needs to fix the boarders, etc. BEFORE this reform. As here in California and many border states are sucked dry due to the illegals in our hospitals. Seriously they go to the emergency for every little thing. And when our county (Los Angeles County) has several million illegals, it brings down the medical facilities.

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  10. Have you seen the Michael Moore movie “Sicko?” I know he says that we are not making a Canadian or European health care system. But maybe we should :-)All I know is that we have health care. But it's horrible. After Michael's 2 1/2 weeks in the hospital…I cannot even begin to tell you how huge our portion was. Or that we are being billed 13,000 dollars because the helicopter that flew him to another hospital was out of network (ummm…there was an in network option? There was an option?). Or that all his cognitive therapy was not covered…and we didn't find out until after the fact. Even those with insurance have ridiculuous fights with the insurance companies.

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  11. I didn't listen to the speech, but have read the gist of it. It is obvious even to the complete twits out there that health care reform is desperately needed. Basic medical coverage ensures that a society can function smoothly, and I don't think profit alone should be trusted to make this work. For the same reason that the fire department is not a private entity. What would happen if they worked on a for-profit basis? There would be a lot more fires of suspicious origins in affluent areas, and small or poor communities would have no fire department at all. As you know, I have lived in Europe for a number of years (in France, England, and Germany) and I have seen the ways it can work. Even though the 3 systems are very different, they all ensure that everyone, EVEN the IMMIGRANTS, get affordable basic coverage. In Germany, there is no state-run medical system; but there is a requirement that everyone has insurance. The system works. Of course those who earn more pay more into the system, and in effect subsidize those who are not able to pay. But it works. Students pay almost nothing, but when they get good jobs, they are effectively paying back for the cheap cover they got during college. The immigrants– if they are low salaried– pay very little; but when they graduate to real jobs they pay just like everyone else (this applies to me— and I think you fall into this category too, through your husband's employer). I applaud Obama's courage in taking on such a powerful and well-entrenched lobby, and hope he can convince the colleagues in Congress to do the right thing and initiate change to our rotten system. End of sermon. I will be quiet now. 🙂

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  12. I'm slowly pulling back from American politics. I find it too stressful. Realistically, unless something changes pretty dramatically, it just doesn't affect me anymore. I've been gone from the States now for nearly five years. When I follow the news from the States these days it just depresses me and stresses me out. Such vitriol. Black and white with no gray. And nothing ever changes really. I was really excited when Obama was elected, but I'm coming to realize that he's just another politician. Chances are that health care isn't going to get any better.I've lived in two different countries with single payer health coverage for the last five years. Both of my sons were born in these systems. I've had a couple of operations in these systems. It works, wonderfully. And I've paid absolutely nothing beyond the reasonable tax rate that I pay for health coverage. My fellow countrymen should be so lucky. My, that was depressing. Sorry to come to your blog for the first time and unload with some grim comment.Here's some optimism. I've been living in two different countries with single payer health coverage for the last five years. Both of my sons were born in these systems. I've had a couple of operations in these systems. They work. Wonderfully.

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  13. For someone who has always lived in Canada with government run health care, I can't figure out why people would think that idea is a bad one? I'm all for market competition, but not with health care. The heath, safety and lives should just simple not be a for-profit business. That seems insane to me.A system that has an insurance agent behind a desk decide if my children should actually receive the treatment/operation a DOCTOR has told me is necessary is flawed beyond belief. I applaud Obama for trying to fix this, and I really hope everyone simmers down long enough to let him help you guys.

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  14. I work in health care. I want doctors to decide on the best course of care for their patients. Things have to change. The insurace practices of “gate keepers” that deny people the care that they need has got to change!

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  15. I'm slowly pulling back from American politics. I find it too stressful. Realistically, unless something changes pretty dramatically, it just doesn't affect me anymore. I've been gone from the States now for nearly five years. When I follow the news from the States these days it just depresses me and stresses me out. Such vitriol. Black and white with no gray. And nothing ever changes really. I was really excited when Obama was elected, but I'm coming to realize that he's just another politician. Chances are that health care isn't going to get any better.I've lived in two different countries with single payer health coverage for the last five years. Both of my sons were born in these systems. I've had a couple of operations in these systems. It works, wonderfully. And I've paid absolutely nothing beyond the reasonable tax rate that I pay for health coverage. My fellow countrymen should be so lucky. My, that was depressing. Sorry to come to your blog for the first time and unload with some grim comment.Here's some optimism. I've been living in two different countries with single payer health coverage for the last five years. Both of my sons were born in these systems. I've had a couple of operations in these systems. They work. Wonderfully.

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