Iceland; stunning beauty & lots of people

Last week, my family and I went to Iceland for a week long adventure. We’ve been thinking about going to Iceland for a few years, and when we lived in London we never managed to make the trip.

So a trip involving an 8 hour time difference seemed like the perfect time right?

Right.

Iceland is very, very beautiful. When you arrive in the heart of winter everything is covered in snow {often including yourself as well}. There is something about the pure whiteness of snow that seems to be magical. It is pure and to me, has a quiet reverence.

{I could be feeling this way because I went to mass this morning, something I haven’t done on my own, voluntarily, without a family member or holiday involved in probably 15-16 years?? There is an ‘afterglow’ after church. I always felt that way as a kid, likening it to simply being released from sitting still, but I found it this morning as well, awkward as it was to be in a church I’d never been to before, with people I’d never met.}

Here are the things i knew about Iceland before we traveled.

It’s cold. No, really cold. (and it did not disappoint in this area, though being in 3 layers top and bottom plus coat, hat, gloves and waterproof boots, I was toasty warm.)

IMG_3546

Iceland is expensive. No. SERIOUSLY FREAKING EXPENSIVE.

We ate lunch one day at a tomato farm, and while you think okay, upticked prices for the scenery (which was cool, eating lunch right next to the tomatoes that were in the soup I was eating was cool). But a bowl of soup (unlimited) and bread was 2400 kroner, which is roughly $24. We had breakfast at a cafe around the corner from our AirBNB and bowl of porridge was 1900 kroner = $19. For oatmeal. It was fabulous but…

Be prepared if you go. I’ve lived in central London. I’ve been to Norway. They’ve got nothin’ on Icelandic prices.

IMG_3490

Iceland is crowded. I’d read that it is becoming one of the hottest (unfortunately, not literally) places to visit. I’d read there are crowds. But nothing really prepares you for the HORDES of people everywhere, even the ‘out of the way’ places our guide took us on day 2. People everywhere.

fullsizeoutput_4be

DSC00107DSC00108

These are with severe editing to try to take the people out of my pictures. Maybe it was the week we went being a holiday for most US schools, and Chinese New Year, I don’t know, but if you are looking for a remote, lonely vacation, Iceland is not the way to go.

While I am still glad we went, it did diminish the experience for me a bit.

fullsizeoutput_4bd

DSC00081fullsizeoutput_4b9fullsizeoutput_4baDSC00090

DSC00093

Shoe Crampons for the win

DSC00097DSC00100DSC00103DSC00110fullsizeoutput_4bbDSC00114DSC00116DSC00117DSC00120

The other things I learned about Iceland: In Reykjavik they do not shovel the sidewalks. No, they really don’t. Whenever we walked anywhere (which was all the time) you just slug along through the snow/slush/ice. It seems to be a regular thing. The only places that had cleared sidewalks were those in the very heart of the city who had the benefit of the underwater hot spring which they use under the sidewalks to melt the snow in certain areas. {I have pictures of sidewalks and the city etc on my Instagram. Phone shots were easier in the city than large camera shots.} So when you are out on tour, Crampons (little spikes you put on over your shoes) are your friend. Your best friend.

We spent several days at the beginning of our trip in Reykjavik and then we went on a 3 day tour with Goecco. Our guide, Gunni, was really interesting and very friendly. He previously was a movie scout in Iceland. Small little movies like Interstellar. To say he knows Iceland, is saying something. He had some great stories in the evenings at the guest house.

While the tour itself definitely was great – and I say that even though we had rain/hurricane winds most of the time, and I unfortunately learned the difference between waterproof and water resistant – I wasn’t as huge of a fan of the ‘living’ part of the tour. Me and 15 other people sharing a guest house. It is definitely a dorm situation with shared showers (welcome to college life kids!).

Food is another area to keep in mind. If you are at all a person who doesn’t eat fish (that’d be me and one of my kids), you are kind of out of luck. Fish will be the only thing on the menu, and unfortunately, our microwave macaroni cups did not come in handy. As the guest house had no microwave. Lunch one day was whatever chips/cookies you could find at the convenience store.

All I’m saying is be prepared if you don’t eat fish, or you enjoy regular meals. I ate a heck of a lot of Kind bars and fruit strips.

It was a successful trip; the husband finally saw the Northern Lights after 10 years of trying, those pictures are somewhere on another SD card, though I will say I never saw any of the green in the pictures. That is actually a product of leaving the camera shutter open. The green isn’t often visible to the naked eye. It really does require the miraculous set of perfect conditions to see them like that, or really see them at all.

Would I go back? That seems to be the ultimate judge of a vacation for me. Scotland, Ireland, Hawaii, all unequivocally YES.

Iceland gets a maybe. I’d like to see it in the summertime. Gunni says it’s a complete different world, all the colors and pearls hiding under the snow. The popularity, and expense, definitely give me pause. But if you get the chance to go, GO. It’s a beautiful place with friendly people, and a real look at how people survive in a pretty harsh climate.

fullsizeoutput_4bc

SaveSaveSaveSave

2 thoughts on “Iceland; stunning beauty & lots of people

  1. I was there in January and there were not the crowds I”m seeing in your pictures! I loved Iceland and would love to go back in the summer. Lush green landscape and 23 hour days. 🙂

    Like

  2. Pingback: Allergy Chaos | The Umbrella Life

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s